Euro 2012 – Day Three … another brick in the wall

A piece of the Berlin Wall at Potsdam Platz

Putting a massive telly in front of the Brandenburg Gate to watch the football on is a great idea. There’s just one slight flaw in the plan. If you do that, you can’t see much of the Brandenburg Gate (at least from the western side).

A big telly, yesterday. In the background is the Brandenburg Gate
It’s not the most respectable approach to a venerable monument that was obscured and cut off by a hideous structure for much of the 20th Century. And it really wasn’t helped by the fact that they didn’t even bother to turn it on for what promised to be one of the early highlights of the tournament – Sunday’s showdown between Italy and Spain. That’s why, after a healthy walk across the length of the Tiergarten, the vast and slightly wild urban park at the heart of Berlin, I joined a young crowd of Italians and Spaniards huddled around a television no bigger than the one in my living room.
The crowd in the fan park
The atmosphere in the Hyundai Fan Park was great, the beer overpriced and I went and sat down in a nearby bar for the second half. So nice idea Berlin and the sponsors – but think it through next time.
A better view of the Brandenburg Gate from the east, with actors mugging as Russian and American guards in front of it

Spain in pain?
The Spanish certainly didn’t look like a side who’d lost their appetite, but maybe they have lost their way a little. My dad reckons the state of the pitch in Gdansk didn’t help their passing game. Italy fielded what must be the first all-certifiable strike partnership in the history of international football, and it was no surprise to see Mario Balotelli withdrawn before he could get himself sent off – while Antonio Cassano wasn’t much better. It was no surprise that they went ahead and no coincidence that the goal came the first time Andrea Pirlo – the king of the 2006 World Cup – got on the ball and drove forward. He’s knocking on a bit, but if Pirlo is on form, don’t rule Italy out of this competition.

Dire Eire
Found a very nice Irish bar (with a very nice Irish waitress) in the basement of the famous Europa Centre, near Zoo Station. That was the highlight of the evening, as the inadequacies of some of the Irish players – especially Keith Andrews and Stephen Ward – were painfully exposed by the Croatian master technicians. No doubt it won’t stop the Irish fans having fun, but with Italy and Spain to come, their prospects look dire.

Croat on the town

Party time for Berlin’s Croatians

One thing that Berlin wasn’t short of last night was pissed up Croats. They were a sight to behold, although it was a bit alarming that they were driving up and down the famous Kurf├╝rstendamm shopping street flying their flags and sounding their horns, in everything from scooters to rather posh cars. A big green police van’s sirens added to the cacophony, and there was a touch of the Keystone Cops about the way the Croats made sharp U-turns and headed back up the street, foxing their pursuers. I have video of this, but no facility to edit it at the moment!

There must be more to life …
Not wishing to perpetuate any national stereotypes but … firstly, I’ve eaten more sausages in the last three days than I have in the last three years. Fortunately Berlin seems to have plenty of ethnic eating options, which will have to be explored in the next few days. Secondly, the Deutsche Bahn is incredibly efficient, whizzing from Hamburg to Berlin in a little more than an hour and a half. Spacious seats, clean carriages, helpful staff … Britain’s railways have improved hugely, but they’re still frighteningly far behind.

The Bundestag is surrounded by some remarkable modern architecture
The Germans have also done a marvelous job of recreating the heart of their city, with modern architecture sitting comfortably alongside the rejuvenated Bundestag building.

A mystery … solved
In my first blog post, I bemoaned the fact that everyone (from the toilet attendant and the beggars upwards) pinned me as an English speaker instantly. Strangely, with the glasses on, the opposite is true. Random strangers attempt to start conversations in German … to which I reply ‘ist gut, ja’ and grin inanely, hoping against hope that they’re not telling me my flies are undone. Pictorial evidence below.

English yobbo
Sophisticated continental type

Euro 2012 – Day One reflections

Hamburg’s Rathaus, or town hall

Guten tag from the beautiful city of Hamburg, for the first blog of a person Euro 2012 journey that will take in three cities, two countries, a couple of live matches, a bit of culture and (undoubtedly) a lot of beer. And probably not all that many blog posts.

Day One of Euro 2012 was observed through the smog of jetlag, so please take this into account!

The Russians are coming
Undoubtedly the day belonged to Russia, who tore to pieces a Czech Republic side not known for being flakey in major tournaments. Their passing and movement was a joy to behold and it’s not too hard to believe that they could win this tournament – or certainly be the best ever team to come out of Russia (remember that the Soviet Union’s Euro 88 finalists were almost all Ukrainians). Certainly the many who tipped Alan Dzagoev to be the breakout star of the tournament can afford to feel a little smug this morning.

Poles apart
A successful home nation (or two) is handy for any tournament, and the way Poland started their opening game gave plenty of cause for optimism. They really got at the Greeks, with wingers targeting the area between the full back and central defender in a manner somewhat reminiscent of England. Their dominance in the first half was absolute, but there was a nagging doubt that the one goal would be enough, and so it proved as the Greeks scored a fortuitous equaliser and would have had a somewhat undeserved victory had it not been for Przemyslaw Tyton’s penalty save after Wojciech Szczesny was sent off. Poland rallied late on, but you couldn’t help but feel that what they really needed was two versions of the superb Robert Lewandowski – one to make the chances, the other to finish ’em off.

Aren’t Germans nice?

This is how to tastefully integrate old buildings and modern shops. Take note HK!

Coming from the cool, keep-your-distance world of Hong Kong, the warmth of the German people is a joy to behold – as is the fact that they manage to install shops in old buildings tastefully and manage to preserve their heritage without sacrificing their old buildings. One thing I’m wondering is – why does every German greet me in English? Do I give off a vibe of Englishness? If so, how do I make it stop?

Purely for Lolz, here’s a quick poll

I can’t fix the Euro 2012 draw (and it wouldn’t help England much anyway)

So, flushed by the success of a not-too-far-from perfect guess at the World Cup draw (and let’s … erm … draw a veil over how it actually turned out). Here’s a look at what tomorrow night’s Euro 2012 draw might throw up.

I said about 10 minutes after Poland/Ukraine got the event that England would end up in the deepest coal mine in the eastern Ukraine. Looking at the event map, that would seem to mean Donetsk and Group D alongside Ukraine, probably in slot D3.

Let’s assume also that Uefa don’t like the idea of the Germans going to Poland or Russia going to Ukraine or playing Poland, so Germany take the second seeded place in Group B and Russia go to Group C. That leaves Italy in Group A. They’re not going to fancy a Germany/Holland clash, at least so early in the competition, so Spain go into Group B as top seeds and Holland in Group C.

The bottom half of the draw is less obviously tempting for the fix-minded. But let’s assume that the Uefa wallahs don’t fancy both of the host nations going out early, so fast-emerging France go into one of the other pools – for the sake of argument, Group B. They’ll want to avoid an England-Ireland game so let’s have Ireland in Group A. If the rest of the draw is random, the final pools might look something like this:

  • Group A: Poland, Italy, Croatia, IRELAND
  • Group B: Spain, Germany, Greece, France
  • Group C: Netherlands, Russia, Portugal, Czech Republic
  • Group D: Ukraine, ENGLAND, Sweden Denmark

So, assuming it goes according to Fifa rankings (as it surely won’t), that would give us these quarter finals:

Croatia vs Germany

Netherland vs Denmark

Spain vs Italy

England vs Portugal

So another defeat to Ronaldo’s lot, realistically, or a stuffing by Spain in the semi-finals. Either way, we’ll have fun hopefully in Gdansk, where I’m planning to be for the early part of the finals!